It’s about value, every square centimetre costs you money so you want to fill up every last bit of that space. It makes sense, it feels right and when you look at it, you see all of the value you have to provide your customers. But do they, confronted by all of this information, know exactly what you want them to do?

While an economical and efficient use of space certainly has its place in certain graphic design projects, it can restrict your ability to introduce a directive for your customer. Humans on the whole, are indecisive creatures prone to react rather than act alone. So no matter how informative or entertaining your design, if it doesn’t implicitly or explicitly ask the person viewing it to do something.. chances are, they will do nothing, even if you have done a fantastic job of imparting your value proposition.




White space isn’t just empty space, it is intentionally empty space. Think about a large blocked out square, it is full of information but has not direction. Introducing some intentional white space to make it into an arrow gives you something to follow, you might even call it a purpose. A graphic designer introduces white space in order to accomplish the same thing on a deeper level. When combined with hierarchy and other visual design techniques, white space creates the same kind of arrow only instead of pointing someone to the bathroom, it points them towards the action you would like them to make.




The other important thing that white space introduces is breathing room. Much like the full stop or comma in a sentence, if you draw things out too long without a breath (or an intentional reason to do so), your customer may become fatigued by the experience. They might even misunderstand your intentions, or be confused about what you want them to do either because they stopped reading, or because too many ideas were packed too closely together. This entanglement can undo any of the actual information you are trying to impart, muting your message and a message that can’t be heard, is doing nothing for your business.

It may initially feel right to fill up all that space, cram in as much as you can, tell your customers everything in one breathe with all of the passion that you can muster… but in the long run it hurts what you want to achieve. Such that giving your customers what they want or need, improving their lives and helping them to be happier and healthier starts getting further away rather than closer.

Sometimes more, actually means less. So the next time you get that project designed, take a moment to consider the amount of content you have, what is most important and what you want to say so that you can craft a lengthy experience rather than a jump scare. Craft something that your customer will love, rather than feel costed by. Craft something that will help your business sustain and make even more money, rather than simply being a suck on your time and energy.